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Wrongful Termination Lawsuits & Claims

Crosner Legal solely represents employees, not employers, in wrongful termination and retaliation claims and lawsuits. We have represented employees in wrongful termination and retaliation claims in all forums and venues within California, including:

  • Lawsuits in civil courts in a majority of California counties;
  • Administration actions relating to the Department of Fair Housing & Employment (“DFEH”), Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) and/or the California Labor Board; and
  • Arbitrations

Some examples of claims Crosner Legal has successfully represented employees in include wrongful termination and/or retaliation resulting from:

  • Discrimination;
  • Hostile Work Environment;
  • Unpaid Wages; and
  • Sexual Harassment

In California, the Fair Employment and Housing Act creates a comprehensive coverage to protect against employment discrimination by protecting and safeguarding the right and opportunity of all persons to seek, obtain, and hold employment free from discrimination. It requires employers to treat all individuals equally by evaluating each person on the basis of individual skills, knowledge, and abilities and not on the basis of characteristics generally attributed to a group protected by the law.  The regulations make clear that, with extremely limited exceptions, the Fair Employment and Housing Act applies to virtually all California employers, regardless of whether they are operated by the government, or are private, proprietary, or nonprofit.

More specifically, employers that are subject to the Fair Employment and Housing Act are prohibited from discriminating against any person with respect to hiring, firing, compensation, and virtually all terms, conditions, and privileges of employment. Thus, in the absence of a valid defense, such employers will be liable if they discriminate on the basis of any of the following:

  • Race; 
  • Color; 
  • National origin;
  • Ancestry; 
  • Sex (including breastfeeding or medical conditions related to breastfeeding);
  • Gender (including a person’s gender identity and gender expression);
  • Pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical condition;
  • Marital status; 
  • Religious creed;
  • Physical disability; 
  • Mental disability; 
  • Medical condition (any health impairment related to or associated with a diagnosis of cancer and genetic characteristics);
  • Genetic information;
  • Sexual orientation;
  • Age 40 or over;
  • Military and veteran status.

Many of the above characteristics are also protected by one of the federal civil rights laws, such as Title VII, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Rehabilitation Act.

Notably, the Fair Employment in Housing Act also establishes a basis to impose liability against any employer found guilty of unlawful harassment, sexual harassment or a hostile work environment.

Additionally, circumstances may arise where an employee resigns and claims that he or she was constructively discharged. If an employee is able to demonstrate that a constructive discharge did occur and that it violated a legal obligation of the employer, the employee can pursue the same rights and remedies as would be available if the employee were simply fired.

Various remedies may be imposed against employers who have engaged in unlawful discrimination. The most common approach to determining an appropriate remedy is to “make whole” the individual who is the victim of unlawful discrimination. However, remedies available under certain state and federal civil rights laws are not restricted to make whole relief. Punitive and compensatory damages may also be awarded in appropriate cases. Examples of the types of “make whole” and other forms of relief that may be provided under these laws include the following: 

  • Back Pay
  • Fringe Benefits
  • Front Pay
  • Other Forms of Equitable Relief
  • Punitive and Compensatory Damages

Below you will find information on the various aspects of wrongful termination, retaliation, and discrimination laws, and answers to commonly asked questions relating to these issues.

You will also find information on how to obtain a lawyer, which is something you will likely need to do if you are considering taking legal action against a company who wrongfully terminated or retaliated against you. A lawyer can assist in investigating and assessing your wrongful termination, retaliation and/or constructive termination claims in advance of you taking any formal actions, such as filing a complaint in court. A majority of lawsuits, including wrongful termination, retaliation and constructive termination claims, are resolved by settlement prior to a trial or arbitration award. Attorneys experienced in this field, such as Crosner Legal, can greatly help in guiding you to the best course of action, including timely settlement and maximum recovery of your claims.

Wrongful Termination & Retaliation: The Basics

What is wrongful termination?

Can you sue for wrongful termination?

How to sue for wrongful termination in 8 steps

When can you sue for wrongful termination?

Hiring Crosner Legal For Your Wrongful Termination Lawsuit

How much does it cost to sue for wrongful termination?

Locations that Crosner Legal services: Los Angeles (Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Greater Los Angeles), Orange County, San Francisco, Oakland, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Jose, Sacramento

How to obtain a free consultation for your wrongful termination?

Wrongful Termination Q & A

How to file a DFEH Complaint for wrongful termination and/or harassment, hostile work environment or sexual harassment

How to file an EEOC Complaint for wrongful termination and/or harassment, hostile work environment or sexual harassment

How to file a Labor Board Complaint for retaliation

How much compensation can you get for wrongful termination

How to prove wrongful termination

California Wrongful Termination Laws

This article provides a comprehensive overview of wrongful termination laws in California